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3 Red Foxes...

hueyville

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This morning got a late start to work (Saturday can move slow if want) and as stepped out door saw something have never seen. Not one, not two but three red foxes in my back yard. First glance thought it may be feral cats but slowed my roll and got a view of nothing seen in my life but three fox all together. See the occasional single fox around the house so know we have them and seen two out in the wild but never three. Appeared to be a mature male and juvenile male vying for a shot at a female. With average litters of four to five odds are they will reproduce enough that come winter I can harvest a couple without worry of depleting the population.

Have trapped them before but trapping may be an issue now that have neighbors either sides with kids but the 22 LR or 22 Hornet should take them fine if they are now territorial around here. Have seen on average about two to three per year in vicinity of the house but assumed was seeing the odd wayward one just moving through but we have so many deer, ground hogs, squirrel, raccoons, coyote and other wildlife why not fox. Are fox pelt of any value or just having something made of fox pelts I harvested on the Ponderosa would be cool. Instead of urban cowboy its urban mountain man.
 

Southern 7.62

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This morning got a late start to work (Saturday can move slow if want) and as stepped out door saw something have never seen. Not one, not two but three red foxes in my back yard. First glance thought it may be feral cats but slowed my roll and got a view of nothing seen in my life but three fox all together. See the occasional single fox around the house so know we have them and seen two out in the wild but never three. Appeared to be a mature male and juvenile male vying for a shot at a female. With average litters of four to five odds are they will reproduce enough that come winter I can harvest a couple without worry of depleting the population.

Have trapped them before but trapping may be an issue now that have neighbors either sides with kids but the 22 LR or 22 Hornet should take them fine if they are now territorial around here. Have seen on average about two to three per year in vicinity of the house but assumed was seeing the odd wayward one just moving through but we have so many deer, ground hogs, squirrel, raccoons, coyote and other wildlife why not fox. Are fox pelt of any value or just having something made of fox pelts I harvested on the Ponderosa would be cool. Instead of urban cowboy its urban mountain man.
Why shoot them?
 

Invictus77

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Foxes around here I generally leave alone. Small animals eat even smaller animals so I'm thinking they are cutting down the mouse population. The only exception to that was a few years ago when one decided to walk up to our pool and hang around one morning and the wife was worried he would hurt her Shih-Tzu. He did not walk away from the pool area upon her request.

They are legal game here during late bow season. If I ever get a good chance to stick one, I would do a full body mount. Bobcats fall in the same category.
 

EinheitElf

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Maaaan, I would leave bobcats alone, hell anytime I see them they are a blur going the other way...now coyotes...yea lots here even in suburbia. Even had a mountain lion in mission viejo on a couples deck, jumped in lake and swam for it...then ,assume was same lion,went into an office building, cops called, thank god they trainqed it and re eleased back into the wild. Shame really because soooo much woodland has burned here the animals are having a bad time foraging,specially the predators like mtn lions and bobcats. The yotes come right into the hood and eat the bunnies munching on the lawns....as well as small dogs,cats and so on. Like I said I am glad they did not kill the Mtn Lion.
I dont get it, people look at yotes and go 'just like dogs,they our friend...' then see puma and like 'OMFG EVIL ANIMAL,KILLLLLL IT!!!!!

WTF people.... right now there are TOOOO many 2 legged POS'S here in the population that REALLY need to take a dirt nap.....
 

badzero

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I’ve got one that hunts through my back yard here in suburbia, some nights it comes up on the back porch and talks to the cat through the glass door. The 2 of them make some weird ass noises at each other. I’ve seen it catch mice in the grass so I don’t mess with it.
 

Sig220

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Foxes always get to walk unless they act crazy like they have rabies. The furs down south are not like they have to grow in the cold climates and that is another reason to let them pass.
Bobcats usually get a pass unless there are turkey in the area and then they are kept in check. Coyotes and pigs are open season as far as I care.
 

Liberty Prime

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This morning got a late start to work (Saturday can move slow if want) and as stepped out door saw something have never seen. Not one, not two but three red foxes in my back yard. First glance thought it may be feral cats but slowed my roll and got a view of nothing seen in my life but three fox all together. See the occasional single fox around the house so know we have them and seen two out in the wild but never three. Appeared to be a mature male and juvenile male vying for a shot at a female. With average litters of four to five odds are they will reproduce enough that come winter I can harvest a couple without worry of depleting the population.

Have trapped them before but trapping may be an issue now that have neighbors either sides with kids but the 22 LR or 22 Hornet should take them fine if they are now territorial around here. Have seen on average about two to three per year in vicinity of the house but assumed was seeing the odd wayward one just moving through but we have so many deer, ground hogs, squirrel, raccoons, coyote and other wildlife why not fox. Are fox pelt of any value or just having something made of fox pelts I harvested on the Ponderosa would be cool. Instead of urban cowboy its urban mountain man.
I'd check and make sure that they don't have a den on your property if you or any neighboring properties have livestock like chickens close by.

I had to dispatch two last summer that kept killing chickens and the den was on my property so it was my responsibility.

A buddy near me said a couple of years ago he had 4 run out and kill 4 chickens while they free ranged.

If none of you have livestock I guess I wouldn't worry too much.

It's sort of past season for it here in VA but if they're still mating there, maybe go out on your land at night, sit quiet and listen.

When a fox is being territorial he'll run in a circle as big as he thinks his territory is. All the while, he'll be barking this hoarse little bark that sounds like a small dog smoked cigarettes or did "wippits."

If you hear an encircling bark like that then you'll know they're marking territory and have a good idea what their range is. You can really hear it well with electronic earmuffs just sitting in a tree stand.

Like I said, in VA mating season has passed (jan-feb) but I can't speak for GA.
 

VALMET

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Why shoot them?
This was my first thought ^^^. On the rare occasion I see foxes around here the last thing I’d want to do is shoot them. Now if you’re raising fowl or it seemed to he rabid that’s a different story completely.
 
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hueyville

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I have never thought of shooting or trapping fox around the Ponderosa but until other day occasionally would see one at a time. Have learned from other species if start seeing multiples at same time then population is moving to healthy or overpopulated. Going to be more alert to them (set up some more motion sensing game cams in back yard) and if we have more than thought will take two or three next winter.

It gets cold enough in Northeast Georgia foothills/mountains of the Appalachian range that we have decent pelts in winter. Growing up on our farm surrounded by 5,000 acres of protected forest (had permission to trap till was sold for a WMA) ran a trap line every winter. Local man who made accessories and clothing for the black powder crowd payed good for pelts. Back then we still had massive numbers of wild quail but then came the coyotes which decimated them and why never let a coyote walk. Same now with wild hogs. Only shoot raccoons if they become pests.

In high school made good money shooting ground hogs on turnip farms and crows during planting season on corn fields. I really enjoy shooting ground hogs, crows and coyote. Used to take at least two summer trips out west every year where spent off days from climbing and cycling to shoot prarie dogs. Seeing three fox at one time means I need to pay attention and if proves to be healthy population culling a couple or three come winter won't hurt and would like a few pelts for a friend who is big into the "mountain man" scene.
 

TraFALgar

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I saw a Nature special a couple yrs ago on foxes. They did one segment about foxes in U.K. Since they've pretty much stopped the fox & hounds hunts now, foxes are prospering & moving into the suburbs. One town had an estimated 23 foxes per square kilometer!! A biologist was feeding them in her garden (backyard) ... 4 or 5 would just come out of the shrubberies and lay around her backyard waiting for her to toss out chicken pieces to them. 😋
 
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medicmike

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Years ago had a family of Foxes make a den in the culvert under my driveway. They were pretty darned shy but did catch the mom and kits playing in the driveway a few times. It was a rare treat. These were gray (or silver, not sure of the official designation). Never saw red foxes on the left coast. But when I saw Red Fox I thought of this.

 

hueyville

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I don't kill everything. Have a health population of deer (see them every day, especially dead in road as turn out of driveway), lots of hawks which are never disturbed, I dont even fish. Any ground hog, coyote and now chipmunks are game on. Next door neighbor is about to spend an estimated $50,000 (may be more) because ground hogs dug dens all around his house to get warmth through the concrete blocks and his basement foundation is now cracked so bad county has given him till lease ends to let tenants leave and fix foundation or demolish his family home.

Didn't worry about chipmunks but they have over populated so much there are holes everywhere that flood when rains so they are moving under eves of house next to my basement. Coyotes are just flea infested mangy disease carriers. If we have significant fox population then culling is healthy and why said I was putting out more game cams to access the situation. If turns out those three are all we have around they will live. If determine have dozens will fill a couple. I also cull crows as wife nor I like them aggregating us and would shoot buzzards if legal as we have a significant issue with two houses in site of us having to replace roofs from damage caused by buzzards. Same with squirrel, long as they keep trying to chew into house they die. If your house gets infested with rats are you going to give your wife some liberal love all the creatures crap or put out traps.
 

gw104

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Get real Huey, you posted that you seen three foxes in your back yard. Your first thought was if there is more, I can kill a couple. Yep, need to kill them so I can have something made from the pelts here on the Ponderosa. I thought it funny that a man like yourself that is always bragging about what you have and, what you are always buying would be wondering if they were worth anything.
By the way a rat infestation is a world away from three foxes in the backyard.
 

John A

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Yeah, I like foxes.

Long as they're not eating chickens or sucking eggs.

We have had several fox up on the land where I grew up. The coyotes and wolves are moving in more and pushing them out though :(
 

hueyville

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Yes I asked if fox pelts had any real value as that could have some bearing on if harvested them or not, money is money and can always use more. They recently discontinued the Georgia Coyote Challenge due to tree hugger complaints about folks being rewarded for killing wildlife even though coyote are putting lots of pressure on our deer population plus killing peoples pets, chickens and other small farm animals.

Discovered due to a national overpopulation issue (everywhere but southern California, apparently even fox don't want to live in Cali) red fox pelts are bringing $15 to $25 average with the nicest ones from up north bringing up to $75. If shot all three wouldn't buy a weeks groceries and found website who will ship me tanned pelts for less than my time to shoot and tan myself. That said according to local news reports along with DNR, red fox population is growing exponentially around us while the grey fox population is in critical decline. All of this is good information to know as won't shoot a grey fox even if becomes a nuciance but would call DNR to remove it/them.

DNR estimate hunters are killing 40,000 coyotes per year in Georgia and it's not near enough as population is increasing like wild hogs and they are moving into urban areas where even occasional persons attacked and are biggest current threat to our deer population. Almost every morning five to seven deer hop gate of our rear fence then wander trying to get out usually exiting front gate at road where I hit three at one time in my truck or really they hit me.

Used to have friend (new job changed his schedule) with five kids who would come get any deer I shot and tagged, field strip then drop off at processor on his way to work. Killed them wholesale for him. Now that I am not they have become a massive issue again with damage to trucks and wife's flowers. Cranked my truck about a month ago not seeing a group in yard, they panicked and in their frenzy of running around trying to find a way out of the yard damaged two of our trucks just running into them. Would think a deer could see a parked truck.

Having never seen three fox at one time, singles on occasion and two together one time wanted to know more. GA DNR says red fox female will have two to twelve pups in a litter. The parents stay with them several months before sending them off. If have three suddenly seen at one time, means there are more and if the female were to have four to six pups survive then they breed like coyote we could have population issues though fox don't kill deer, hunt mostly small rodents and if they are after my chipmunks then are welcome additions. I was asking for useful information because am just as likely to help them as shoot them, just need to know if they are a positive or negative impact to the Ponderosa.

I admit I have the caveman attitude of kill first, ask questions later. On my fox have figured out they have no negative impact, no real monetary value, likely preying on my huge population of chipmunks and squirrel so they are getting a free walk unless they begin trying to chew the tires off my trucks or eat the wife's tulips. Admit that I enjoy killing, if it were not a sin and illegal could find me by following the trail of dead bodies where morons in traffic p!ssed me off.

If my spine was not so whacked would kill deer wholesale during season and take to the "feed the hungry" drop off location for wild game. Friend who has an offshore fishing boat keeps near Charleston generally brings several hundred pounds of fish back from his bi-monthly fishing trip for the feed the hungry drop off. Mentioned my deer issue to my dentist (comes by house to his office every morning) and next season he plans to leave for work early enough to kill a few of my sunrise deer and get to processor before his first patient. Even doctors like killing.

Any chance I get to kill a squirrel, groundhog, coyote, wild hog, crow, chipmunks and other varmints I blast them to he!! just for the fun of killing. That said shooting a coyote or groundhog at 400ish yards with an AR15 propped on hood or toolbox of truck is some good marksmanship training. Have a pair of bolt rifles built just for murdering crow that think they are out of range if detect a human or just don't see me in my blind. Costs a lot of money to keep my 22 CHeetahs running as usually need a fresh barrel every 800 to 1,000 rounds, can only use small rifle primers match 308 cases to form final case and only like 50 to 54 grain bullets. They may be throat burners but make 400 plus yard crow shots very possible and fun. Reason I now have so many AR15s in 22 Nosler which are throat burners as well, can carry for a defensive truck rifle but zap coyote and ground hogs out past 500 yards with the laser flat trajectory. Have one 22 Nosler AR with 20" 1:8 3R barrel that groups 1.25" at 250 yards.

Asked a question to which I got flack not information. Yes, Georgia has a very healthy red fox population and harvesting one or two would not impact it though not worth the effort unless they become pests. Their value as pelts is not worth the effort to skin them out and tan them. Grey foxes are in sharp decline so will let all of them walk. Am assuming since red fox are moving into residential areas more and more it means there is food. They are known for eating rodents and pilfering trash cans but our trash cans are pest proof and emptied twice per week.

We don't have a rat issue but occasional field mice and lots of chipmunks that are a problem. Neighbors leave dogfood outside and do have rats so assume the fox are chasing my chipmunks, neighbors rats, etc. That is a good thing so they stay and instead of building a fox rifle will make sure to keep a couple DSLRs with long lenses out of case and take pictures of them. In comparison built a pair of 1:9 twist Bentz chamber 14.7" full custom 10/22s with 4-16x AO scopes to use with Eley 38 grain subsonic hollow points just for shooting chipmunks. Those buggers are small, fast and very shy of humans which makes chipmunk murder challenging as have to dope shots close as fifteen feet and far as sixty yards before they take off for their holes which our yard looks like a putting green it has so many.

Like my questions about red fox when my chipmunk infestation got really bad discovered they cause significant damage to trees and since they moved in like an army have lost more trees for unknown reasons than ever. They eat fungi that protect tree roots and root rot has been reason my arborist said most died. He didn't know chipmunks cause root rot till I happened to discover it when deciding if they had any use that should allow them to live. Between killing trees, digging holes tend to trip in when doing yard work and now digging down around foundation it's a full on chipmunk war at the Ponderosa and appears the red fox are an ally in my declared war.

Between angle of potential shots (can't have a miss crossing into neighbors yard), size of pest (average height is three to five inches weighing a few ounces), speed they can get to cover and fact never have time to properly dope wind and distance other than quick guess using my brain the chipmunk war is a great marksmanship challenge. We can choose to let the pests take over causing lots of damage to our homes or we can make a game of killing them. Have seven dedicated squirrel rifles at house (a 22 LR and 22 Hornet at three exterior doors with just a 22 LR at front door which doubles as chipmunk rifle), my other dedicated chipmunk rifle at side door. Have shooting port at bedroom window (6" round hole in ballistic liner so just slide window open a few inches) and suppressed 5.56 with starlight scope for murdering night time coyotes.

If we ever have a zombie apocalypse after decades of shooting squirrel, chipmunks, ground hogs, neighbors rats, neighbors crow, etc targets big as zombies will be easy. Know the distance to almost every tree, fencepost or other feature in my approved shooting fields of fire and dope for 22 LR subsonic, high velocity, 22 Hornet, 5.56 and 22-250 for crow and groundhog on far side of neighbors vegitable garden. Seldom do I have to use a laser rangefinder on the Ponderosa but do keep an anemometer handy as it's amazing how much wind drift can have sending 22 LR subsonic out to fifty yards or more.
 
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Invictus77

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Having never seen three fox at one time......

This photo is from the apron on my attached garage in 2012. They are about 150 yards away on the morning after I cut the front hayfield. Looking for mice I suppose. Those three hung out in/around that patch of woods most of the summer.

1648785856105.png
 
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